Top 5 Most Beautiful Cathedrals in the UK

Travel, UK

Across the UK stand a myriad of magnificent cathedrals, constructed in a range of architectural styles. Perhaps the most famous is St Paul’s in the centre of London. This was built in the 17th century in a Baroque style. Visitors can look around the ornate interior and climb up to the famous dome. There are many tombs and relics to see, including a monument to the Duke of Wellington. With hotels located in the City nearby, travellers can see other famous landmarks such as Big Ben and Trafalgar Square.cathedral in uk

St Philip’s Cathedral was built in Birmingham in 1715. Despite being one of the smallest cathedrals in England, it is an imposing building that stands out amongst the urban cityscape. The interior is famous for its Baroque design, with a number of galleries located between the main pillars on either side of the main nave. Visitors can stay in a hotel near St Philip’s in Birmingham, from which they can explore the pedestrianized city centre. Nearby are the Bullring Shopping Mall and Birmingham’s famous markets. Along Broad Street is Symphony Hall, where many famous orchestras and musicians play.beautiful cathedral in uk

York Minster is one of the largest cathedrals in the north of England. Dating from the early 14th century, it is a mixture of gothic and Early English designs. The cathedral is renowned for its stained glass windows, in particular the Five Sisters and the Great East Window, the largest stained glass window in the world. It is easy for those visiting York to see its magnificent cathedral to find a central York hotel, even as part of a last minute break. York dates from Roman times and is filled with history which is easily explored on foot. Near the cathedral is Clifford’s Tower, a part of which was once York Castle. Visitors can walk up on the medieval castle walls, or stroll along the banks of the river.

Constructed in the late 11th century, Canterbury Cathedral possesses a distinctly Gothic style. Although it follows the traditional cruciform layout, there are a number of other sections that removes it from its Gothic form, including a shrine to the martyr Thomas Becket.

Inverness Cathedral was constructed from local pink sandstone and limestone in the 12th century. It has no transept, but the main axis is lined with a number of stunning stained glass windows depicting scenes from the New Testament. Along each side of the two naves are three pillars, each carved from a single granite block. Visitors can also see local sites such as Inverness Castle. There is easy access to Loch Ness, the Moray Firth and the beautiful landscape of the Highlands.

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